Unusually Pink Impressions: Acer Chromebook 315

As we’ve mentioned in a few podcast episodes, I happen to be a fan of Chromebooks. I have a hulking desktop that I use for things like gaming, programming, and photo editing. That same desktop is also extremely loud and generates enough heat to warm my apartment, whether it needs to be warmed or not. As a result I tend to like having a cheap Chromebook handy when I just need to take care of some email, catch up on my RSS feeds, waste time look at memes on Reddit, or writing posts for our podcast. I’ve had a handful of Chromebooks over the years, and I’ve always been happy with them given that, for me at least, they serve as supplementary for my personal computing needs. I feel like I’d struggle more than a little if a Chromebook was my only computer.

That being said, my previous Chromebook, a Toshiba Chromebook 2, was getting fairly long in the tooth, and I was on the hunt for a new one to replace it. Chromebooks had been undergoing improvements since I purchased the Chromebook 2, but while the device tended to make the list of ones which were allegedly slated to gain access to the Google Play Store and Linux apps, that never seemed to manifest. I had been eyeing the Acer Chromebook 315 and the HP Chromebook 14, as these were the first two Chrome OS devices to feature AMD processors. That seemed pretty slick to me as I’ve long had AMD hardware over Intel and Nvidia; getting nearly the same performance for significantly less money always seemed like a win for me. Ultimately, I pulled the trigger on the Chromebook 315 when Brandi let me know that it was on sale for around $200 during Prime Day, down from the normal $279. $279 itself still isn’t much of a laptop, but again… it’s a Chromebook. I also don’t actually have Amazon Prime, so Brandi did me another solid by ordering it for me, and I just paid her back. She’s awesome, isn’t she?

At any rate, this isn’t titled as a review because I hate the idea of trying to numerically score things. Instead, I figured I’d just write up some thoughts on the device now that I’ve been using it for about a month. I figure I’ll make a similar post for my (relatively) new Pixel 3a XL sometime in the near future, too.

Hardware

Aside from the AMD A4 processor, the Chromebook 315 is pretty standard fare for a mid-range Chromebook. 4 GB of RAM and 32 GB of solid state storage get you up and running. The A4 processor seems to do a pretty solid job of handing most of what I’m using a Chromebook for, which is running a handful of tabs to browse the web, writing code in a text editor, or scrolling through endless memes and videos on Reddit. Even with around 10 tabs and a few PWAs running (the Spotify one kicks ass and takes names), I haven’t noticed any real slowdown or issue. The storage space could potentially be a sore spot, though, and I’ll discuss why in a little more detail when we get to the software section.

Build

The device itself is all plastic, as you’d expect for a laptop that’s only $279 dollars on a bad day. It at least feels solid, though, and isn’t creaky. As a 15” laptop, it weighs in at just under 4 lbs., which seems neither particularly bad or impressive. The hinge for the lid is extremely stiff and almost uncomfortable to pry open from a completely closed position; it would be damn-near impossible to do with a single hand. But the trade-off to that is the screen doesn’t wobble at all, even when quickly typing while the device wrests on an uneven surface like your lap.

The lid features a textured pattern, which concerned me a little bit since I wasn’t able to find any detailed photos or videos of it. I had been worried that, like the Toshiba Chromebook 2, the texture would actually keep me from applying stickers to it. Fortunately, that wasn’t the case at all. My sticker game remains firmly on point. Also, most of my stickers came from Brandi so don’t give me credit for my taste. Did I mention she’s awesome?

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Battery

The battery is rated for 10 hours. To be honest, I’ve left the device sit for days and days at a time without touching it, so I can’t accurately judge the length. I can say that I’ve only had to charge it a handful of times since I got it, though. Running Android applications does seem to to drain the battery at a faster clip, though the screen is the biggest culprit as you’re all but required to have the brightness cranked up pretty high under all circumstances.

Display

Why does the brightness need to be turned up all the time? Because the display is absolute garbage. It may very well be the worst display I’ve ever used on a laptop in my entire life, and that’s no exaggeration from someone who has been using laptops for over a decade. You may be tempted to look at the baseline model and assume that’s because it’s running at 1366 x 768. It’s true that I had been hoping to get the 1920 x 1080 model, but that variant wasn’t on sale during Prime Day and at the time was $70 more. Paying $340 instead of $200 for a laptop just to get a higher resolution screen didn’t seem particularly worthwhile to me, especially when I already had to adjust the text scaling on my 13” 1080p Chromebook 2 so that my myopic ass could actually read anything without my face two inches from the screen. All-in-all, I wasn’t that bummed about the resolution.

The problem is just that the display is horribly washed out. It’s literally incapable of making a color that isn’t pastel. Gray text on an off-white background on a webpage is all but impossible to read with the brightness below 75%. Even when watching videos, the colors are all a lighter hue than you’d expect. While the hardware will easily push the pixels on a display of this low resolution, I’d recommend against this for a device aimed at video. At least the viewing angles are pretty good?

Enjoy some shameless plugs for friends of our podcast!

Enjoy some shameless plugs for friends of our podcast!

Speakers

The speakers are fine. They aren’t great, but being mounted facing up does make a massive difference when compared to other devices I’ve used where the speakers are pointing down underneath the device. I’ve been able to easily listen to Spotify on it without being irritated with the sound or any distortion or vibration.

Ports and Connectivity

Awesome enough, the device features two USB C ports and two USB A ports. Having a USB C port on either side of the device is pretty awesome. One of them will commonly be used for charging; it was nice to see that as the charging solution rather than yet another proprietary connector.

Keyboard

The keyboard is middling at best. I know, I know… for a $279 dollar device, are you expecting a good keyboard? Well… kind of? I’ve owned an Acer CB3-131 before, a device which retailed for $179 and which was made by the exact same company. The keyboard on it was actually significantly better than the one on the CB315. The spacing between the CB315’s keys are good, but typing on it just feels bad. The keys are extremely squishy; it’s very difficult to tell if you’ve actually pressed a key adequately or not while typing quickly, leaving me with a not-insignificant number of missed characters when I’m hammering out these posts. Admittedly, part of that stems from the fact that I’m used to spending most of my time typing on a mechanical keyboard, but I still expected something at least a tiny bit better. That being said, it works well enough for quick tweets and Reddit posts. For longer posts like this, though, I’m more likely to dock it in my work-from-home setup and type on a Razer Blackwidow Tournament Edition Quartz.

Touchpad

It’s a touchpad. It works. It’s exactly what you expect; it’s simultaneously:

  • The same as every other Chromebook trackpad

  • Better than every PC trackpad

  • Worse than every MacBook trackpad

Software

This is where things get interesting for me. I could very easily find from doing searches online prior to purchasing the device that it had Google Play support. This means you can access the Google Play Store just like you would from an Android phone and install any apps you may happen to want. They might look a little janky (because what phone display has a maximum vertical resolution of 768 pixels in 2019?) but they work and they tend to run pretty smoothly. I even tried out a couple of games and found them pretty pleasant. What I was really curious about, though, were Linux apps. On supported devices, you can essentially install a Linux VM and get access to a shell with a full Linux system running underneath it. For the most part, compatible devices depended upon having the appropriate processor architecture, so I wasn’t sure if an AMD processor would throw a wrench into things. Mercifully, that wasn’t the case. I was able to just search the settings for “Linux”, toggle it to on, wait a minute for a download, and then I was up an running.

As you can see here, the VM you get is (at the time of this writing) running Debian 9. You can treat it basically like any other Debian install, including installing the packages you need from the repository. Is the repo missing something you really need? Just download and run the .deb file. Linux aficionados like myself will immediately feel at home.

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I was able to quickly configure Vim and Python3 along with using the lovely rustup toolchain to install the latest version of Rust. All of them work perfectly. This was huge for me because it means I can do some scripting and development on my Chromebook directly. This without having to use which I’d previously do, which was either sit at my loud, furnace of a desktop or use my Chromebook to SSH into a development server.

The one downside to all of this is that 32 GB hard drive. Getting Debian installed took about 2 GB on its own. When you start adding in some Android apps, copying over a few ebooks, and of course take into account Chrome OS itself, I’m looking at 16 GB of remaining space. 50% isn’t a huge issue for me right now, but if I start needing to add a lot of additional Linux packages or Android apps then things could get tight rather quickly. I may have to investigate swapping out the storage in the future if I start to bump my head.

Wrap-up

On the whole, I’m pretty happy with the CB315, especially considering that I paid around 70% of the normal price for it. If I had paid the full price I think I’d still be happy but I’d be slightly more disappointed with the display. It really is atrocious. Chrome OS has come a long way since when I first started using it in 2013, and as a Linux fan it now has so much more value than it did previously. I still don’t think I’d want to roll with a Chromebook as my only personal computer right now, but I can certainly do more with it now than I could before.

Unusually Pink Podcast Links

As we mentioned in our last episode, we recently got our podcast all over the Internet so you can listen to it regardless of which service(s) you happen to prefer.

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Our host for the podcast is Podbean. The posts on the podcast page for each episode will always link to our Unusually Pink Podcast profile there. (Related: we are crushing it on the alliteration front.) We figured most people wouldn’t be listening to it directly from there, though. So if you happen to use any of the following services, feel free to give the podcast a follow and stay on top of the latest episodes. Posts from the website for new episodes, of course, will also be posted to our Twitter and Facebook profiles.

Why does Google have two? Great question.